Melvin Jones’ Biography


Melvin Jones was born on January 13, 1879 in Fort Thomas, Arizona, the son of a United States Army captain who commanded a troop of scouts. Later, his father was transferred and the family moved east. As a young man, Melvin Jones made his home in Chicago, Illinois, became associated with an insurance firm and in 1913 formed his own agency.

He soon joined the Business Circle, a businessmen’s luncheon group, and was shortly elected secretary. This group was one of many at that time devoted solely to promoting the financial interests of their membership. Because of their limited appeal, they were destined to disappear. Melvin Jones, then 38-year-old Chicago business leader, had other plans.

“What if these men,” Melvin Jones asked, “who are successful because of their drive, intelligence and ambition, were to put their talents to work improving their communities??” Thus, at his invitation, delegates from men’s clubs met in Chicago to lay the groundwork for such an organization and on June 7, 1917, Lions Clubs International was born.

Melvin Jones eventually abandoned his insurance agency to devote himself full time to Lions at International Headquarters in Chicago. It was under his dynamic leadership that Lions Clubs earned the prestige necessary to attract civic-minded members.

The association’s founder was also recognized as a leader by those outside the association. One of his greatest honors was in 1945 when he represented Lions Clubs International as a Consultant in San Francisco, California, at the organization of the United Nations.

Melvin Jones, the man whose personal code- “You can’t get very far until you start doing something for somebody else”-became  a guiding principle for public-spirited people the world over, died June 1, 1961 at 82 years of age.

  

Our History

 

  Beginning in 1917

Melvin Jones, a 38-year-old Chicago business leader, asked a simple and world-changing question- What if people put their talent to work improving their communities? Almost 100 years later, Lions Clubs International is the world’s largest service club organization, with 1.35 million members in more than 46,000 clubs and countless stories of Lions acting on the same simple idea: lets improve our communities.

 1920: Going International

Just three years after our founding, Lions became international when we established the first club in Canada. Mexico followed in 1927. In the 1950s and 1960s international growth accelerated, with new clubs in Europe, Asia, and Africa.

 1925: Eradicating Blindness

Helen Keller addressed the Lions Clubs International Convention in Cedar Point, Ohio, USA, and challenged Lions to become “knights of the blind in the crusade against darkness.” Since then, we have worked tirelessly to aid the blind and visually impaired.

 1945: Uniting Nations

The ideal of an international organization is exemplified by our enduring relationship with the United Nations. We were one of the first non-governmental organizations invited to assist in the drafting of the United Nations Charter and have supported the work of the UN ever since.

 1957: Organizing Youth Programs

In the late 1950s, we created the Leo program to provide the youth of the world with an opportunity for personal development through volunteering. These are approximately 144,000 Leos and  5,700 Leo Clubs in more than 140 countries worldwide.

 1968: Establishing Our Foundation

Lions Clubs International Foundation assists Lions with global and large-scale local humanitarian projects. Through our Foundation, Lions meet the needs of their local and global communities.

 1990: Launching SightFirst

Through SightFirst, Lions are restoring sight and preventing blindness on a global scale. Launched in 1990, Lions have raised more than $346 Million for this initiative. SightFirst targets the major causes of blindness: Cataract, trachoma, river blindness, childhood blindness, diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma.

 Today: Extending Our Reach

Lions Clubs International extends our mission of service everyday-in local communities, in all corners of the globe. The needs are great and our services broad, including sight, health, youth, elderly, the environment and disaster relief. Our international network has grown to include more than 207 countries and geographic areas.